Heritage Cities

4 heritage reasons to visit Strasbourg, France

Strasbourg, Petite France

Ah, Strasbourg, city of my heart. I have lived there for my studies for over a year and a half, fell in love with the city and feel the need to go back as often as possible. The capital of the newly established “Grand-Est” French region offers a wide range of cultural heritage assets not only to its tourists, but also to its residents.

1. Strasbourg, historical city

First of all, Strasbourg is a historical city of utmost importance, lying at the crossroads of French and German cultures. Standing on the border, it’s been disputed by the two countries between 1871 and 1944, the inhabitants having to change nationality 4 times in total.

Strolling around the Grande Île (inscribed on the UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1988), you cannot miss the Germanic atmosphere: the typical half-timbered houses, the Gothic architecture or the names of the street translated into the regional Alsatian dialect (which is the same as the dialect in Southern Germany, bearing witness to French-German historic ties). This aptly named historical part of the city is an island surrounded by lovely canals and romantic little bridges, giving it an Amsterdam-like charm. Having the peaceful feeling of a small and friendly village while providing at the same time all the inherent benefits of the 7th biggest French city is to me the biggest asset of Strasbourg.

Strasbourg Cathedral

Strasbourg Cathedral

Although being a source of conflict in the past, Strasbourg is today a true driver of unity between France and Germany, symbolised by the beautiful “ Jardin des Deux Rives” and its bridge allowing pedestrians and cyclists to cross the border easily and without even noticing it. Strasbourg is also the seat of Arte headquarters, a renowned French-German TV channel.

Must-see heritage sites and cultural venues: the gothic Cathedral, the Barrage Vauban (to watch from the roof of the opposite bridge), Strasbourg Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, the Palais Rohan, the Kléber Square, Petite France district, the Broglie Square.

Strasbourg, Vauban Barrage

Strasbourg, Vauban Barrage

2. Strasbourg, European city

Strasbourg is the city where Europe’s construction all started with the first European organisation, the Council of Europe, established in 1949. Covering the “large Europe”, with its 47 member States, this organisation is a true symbol of European cooperation in the field of Human Rights. The imposing headquarters building was constructed in the seventies (evidenced by the interior style and flashy colours) in a district, which is now home to many other European institutions. Later on the European Court of Human Rights, the famous European Parliament, the European Pharmacopoeia or Eurocorps were also established there . Despite the invasion of office buildings, this historic district has not lost its beauty and natural part. The imposing Orangerie Park, the biggest in Strasbourg, is a real hidden treasure and attracts many European civil servants for their lunch break and runners for their Sunday jog.

Strasbourg, Council of Europe

Strasbourg, Council of Europe

It feels invigorating to live in a city that breathes European and contributes to making its residents and tourists, especially the newest generation, more familiar with Europe’s history and new developments. Innovative and ludic activities are organised on the occasion of Europe Day (open days at the EP, guided bike tours in the European district, etc) and all year long to raise awareness of Europe’s shared history and heritage.

Taking all these features into account, Strasbourg’s European district received in 2016 a European Heritage Label by the European Commission as “It bears witness to European integration, the defence of human rights, democracy and the rule of law.”

Strasbourg, European Parliament

Strasbourg, European Parliament

3. Strasbourg, gourmet city

The importance of regional gastronomy in France is no secret. Strasbourg and its many places to eat set a perfect example. One can savour the finest Alsatian traditional specialties all year long, and I must admit that despite the well-known flammekueche (thin crust covered with crème fraiche, onions and bacon) or choucroute (sauerkraut with sausages, salty meats and potatoes), I also discovered must-taste dishes: bibeleskäs (creamy mix of fromage blanc and crème fraiche with fresh herbs and spices), spätzle (the Alsatian noodle), bretzels (especially during Christmas time), or this strong, melting and smelly Munster cheese.

Where to eat traditional: Au Brasseur, Flam’s, La Corde à Linge, Sandkischt, La Choucrouterie.

Family dinner, choucroute

Family dinner, choucroute

Alsace is famous for its wine: Riesling, Gewurtzraminer, pinot gris, noir, blanc, and the regional champagne Crémant. A good way of discovering about traditional wine making and tasting the result is to drive the wine route throughout the lovely typical Alsatian villages and fields. The guided tour of the wineries and tasting are normally for free.

4. Strasbourg, Christmas city

As a grown-up kid, Christmas is my favourite period of the year. People in Strasbourg are really spoiled for Christmas, since it is known and proud to be the European capital of Christmas, its famous 450 year-old Christmas market (Christkindelsmärik) displaying 300 stalls. It simply is fascinating and magical to see the lights and traditional decorations hanging on the facades, smelling mulled wine and roasted chestnuts at every corner, and (try) to walk around the 12 themed Christmas markets. Children, teenagers, young adults, elderly, everybody is just enchanted. What is really specific to Strasbourg and definitely a big asset is that not only the city center plays the Christmas game. Although this latter district remains the must-see, the city as a whole embraces a Christmas spirit.

Strasbourg, Great Christmas Tree on Kléber Square

Strasbourg, Great Christmas Tree on Kléber Square

An absolute highlight is the inauguration night, when the Great Christmas Tree installed on the Kléber Square is illuminated and an invited French artist gives a concert. A hidden gem is the “Carré d’Or”: a few narrow streets in the historical centre forming a square with prestigious decorations, to see rather at night.

Strasbourg Christmas Market, Carré d'Or

Strasbourg Christmas Market, Carré d’Or

Photos: Manon Richard CC BY-SA

Article originally published on Culturaal.com

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